360 Fitness Red Deer Blog

2012 Business of the Year, 2013 Reader's Choice - Best Gym in Red Deer

Hate Dieting? Try This!  - Tips from your Red Deer Gym

Hate Dieting? Try This! Tips from your Red Deer Gym

Lose weight the slow but simple way.

How many times have you gone on a diet only to gain the weight right back when it’s over? We see this all the time at our Red Deer gym. Dieting almost always leads to some weight loss, but it doesn’t always last. In the end, the hunger pains, deprivation, hard work, and possibly a lot of money were all for nothing. Diet and exercise are the best ways to lose weight, but if you’re not willing to make lasting lifestyle changes, the weight loss will only be temporary.

For those looking to lose weight and who are tired of fad diets, try making a few of these changes to your lifestyle. You may not lose as fast, but what you do lose will be gone for good.

Change 1: Be Mindful

Pay attention to your body. It’ll tell you when you’re full and when you’re hungry. Eat slowly and savor each bite. Rushing through meals, eating in front of the television, or letting your eyes decide if you’re hungry all lead to overeating. The moment you feel full, clear the table and put the food away so you’re not tempted to reach for another serving. If it helps, set a timer for 20 minutes. Then slowly eat for that long but no longer.

Change 2: Get More Sleep

In general, if you sleep less than seven hours at night you’ll be hungrier the next day. Sleep is regenerative to your body and helps to regulate your metabolism. In addition, when you sleep you can’t eat more calories. Fewer hours in your day means less time spent eating.

Change 3: Switch Dishes

Chances are, if you’re trying to lose weight, you’re eating more than you should. A simple way to eat proper portions is to use a smaller plate. Fill a salad plate rather than a dinner plate and you’ll easily skim 100–200 calories a day from your diet.

You can also drink fewer calories by replacing your short, fat tumbler with a tall, skinny glass when you’re drinking juice, soda, or alcohol. Your eyes play tricks and you think a shorter glass means less volume, but it’s not always the case. If you are looking for healthy, simple meals - check out the 360 Market at our Red Deer gym.

Change 4: Eat At Home

When you’re in control of the ingredients in your food, it’s much easier to eat healthy. Make a repertoire of simple, quick, low-calorie recipes and keep the ingredients on hand so you’re not tempted to grab fast food.

On the special occasions you do eat out, avoid buffet restaurants, split an entre with a friend, or place half of your food in a to-go box before your meal. Eat less by ordering off the kids’ menu or eating an appetizer for your main dish.

Change 5: Brush or Chew

Cut back on snacking by brushing your teeth after each meal. With clean, minty teeth you’ll be less likely to give in to snack foods. And chew gum between meals to keep your mouth busy—especially during those times when mindless eating is a temptation (at a party, browsing the Internet, or watching TV).

Change 6: Move More

Add physical activity to your daily routine to burn more calories and maintain a healthy weight. So, get off the couch or up from your desk at regular intervals and move around. Take a walk on your lunch break, choose the stairs rather than the elevator, pace the floor while you’re talking on the phone, or work in the yard. Wear a pedometer for extra motivation to get your 10,000 steps a day. Small changes can make a big difference in your weight-loss efforts.

Make Simple Diet Changes

Health is your goal. To get there, you’ve got to eat fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean protein. Include a source of fiber and protein at each meal and snack to provide lasting energy that fills you up.

When possible, switch to low-fat or light versions of your foods to save on calories. Combining these foods with other ingredients, you’ll never know the difference. This goes for mayonnaise, sour cream, yogurt, cheese, milk, and salad dressing.

 

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Shoe Smarts - Tips from Your Red Deer Gym Experts

Shoe Smarts - Tips from your Red Deer Gym Experts.

Wearing the right workout shoe can make all the difference.

Ask your feet and they’ll tell you without hesitation: your choice of workout shoes is an important decision. Your shoes can either improve your performance or increase your risk of pain and injury - and surprised or not - questions about choosing the right shoe come up all the time at our Red Deer Gym. How can you make sure you choose the right shoe? Do you wear what’s in your closet or should you buy a new pair?

If it’s time to go shoe shopping, you may have a difficult time narrowing down your choice to one pair as dozens of brands, prices, and styles of shoes line store shelves. While difficult to decide, you don’t want to make the costly mistake of wearing the wrong kind. Here are the most common workout shoe mistakes that we see around our Red Deer Gym, 360 Fitness, and how to make sure you’re wearing the right pair.

Out with the Old

Whether you’re new to exercise or have been working out for years, it’s easy to make the mistake of wearing an old pair of sneakers to the gym. Maybe they’re your standby for exercise and you’ve had them so long you don’t know what a new pair of shoes would feel like.

Unfortunately, after being worn for a long period of time, shoes begin to lose their support. Even if they still look brand new or have never been worn to run in, they may still lack their original support. Simple, everyday activities can wear down the support. For those new to exercise or those who’ve been exercising for years, the risk of pain or injury increases with an old pair of shoes. Don’t wait until your shoes look old or dirty to buy a new pair.

Runners should be sure to get new kicks every 300 to 500 miles (or about 700kms max). If you don’t keep track of your miles, here’s a good rule to follow: Everyday exercisers replace shoes every six months. Occasional exercisers replace shoes once a year. And specifically, in this case with winter being around 8 months of the year - make sure to track the distances ran in your workouts and on the treadmills at your Red Deer Gym.

Wrong Shoes

There’s no one-shoe-fits-all shoe solution when it comes to sports. A running shoe is made differently than a shoe for tennis, walking, or volleyball. Running shoes have no lateral support because you don’t move side to side, whereas in other sports you need that lateral stability. So obviously, your feet need different types of support depending on the activity you’re doing.

For someone who does a little of everything and isn't concerned with performance, cross-trainers may be a good option. Look for cross-trainers that have a firm heel, are lightweight, and provide adequate support.

Wrong Type

Wearing the right shoe gets even more complicated than tossing the wrong. It’s not just about choosing the right type of shoe for your sport, but choosing the right type of shoe for your foot and gait as well. For running, you can’t just choose a shoe that’s labeled for running and think you’re good to go. Specific shoes are made to support your particular foot shape and running style.

And don’t make the mistake of buying shoes based on their appearance. Instead, go to a specialty shoe store and have a professional salesperson help you find the shoe that truly fits. We have had several members strike out and buy the wrong shoe at our Red Deer gym and really go backwards instead of forward.  A knowledgeable salesperson will take three measurements of your foot (its length, width, and arch) to determine your shoe size. The shoe guru should also evaluate the way your foot hits the ground when you walk or run. Some people’s feet supinate or under-pronate (roll outward), some over-pronate (roll inward), and some have neutral pronation when their feet hit the ground. Under-pronated and over-pronated feet require extra support to avoid injury. This knowledge can help you find the shoe that truly fits.

Old Shoes, wrong shoes, and the wrong type of right shoes are three common mistakes people make. Ensure a successful, pain-free workout by wearing supportive shoes made for your foot and your activity of choice. 

 

 

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Shoe Smarts - Tips from your Red Deer Gym Experts.

Wearing the right workout shoe can make all the difference.

Ask your feet and they’ll tell you without hesitation: your choice of workout shoes is an important decision. Your shoes can either improve your performance or increase your risk of pain and injury - and surprised or not - questions about choosing the right shoe come up all the time at our Red Deer Gym. How can you make sure you choose the right shoe? Do you wear what’s in your closet or should you buy a new pair?

If it’s time to go shoe shopping, you may have a difficult time narrowing down your choice to one pair as dozens of brands, prices, and styles of shoes line store shelves. While difficult to decide, you don’t want to make the costly mistake of wearing the wrong kind. Here are the most common workout shoe mistakes that we see around our Red Deer Gym, 360 Fitness, and how to make sure you’re wearing the right pair.

Out with the Old

Whether you’re new to exercise or have been working out for years, it’s easy to make the mistake of wearing an old pair of sneakers to the gym. Maybe they’re your standby for exercise and you’ve had them so long you don’t know what a new pair of shoes would feel like.

Unfortunately, after being worn for a long period of time, shoes begin to lose their support. Even if they still look brand new or have never been worn to run in, they may still lack their original support. Simple, everyday activities can wear down the support. For those new to exercise or those who’ve been exercising for years, the risk of pain or injury increases with an old pair of shoes. Don’t wait until your shoes look old or dirty to buy a new pair.

Runners should be sure to get new kicks every 300 to 500 miles (or about 700kms max). If you don’t keep track of your miles, here’s a good rule to follow: Everyday exercisers replace shoes every six months. Occasional exercisers replace shoes once a year. And specifically, in this case with winter being around 8 months of the year - make sure to track the distances ran in your workouts and on the treadmills at your Red Deer Gym.

Wrong Shoes

There’s no one-shoe-fits-all shoe solution when it comes to sports. A running shoe is made differently than a shoe for tennis, walking, or volleyball. Running shoes have no lateral support because you don’t move side to side, whereas in other sports you need that lateral stability. So obviously, your feet need different types of support depending on the activity you’re doing.

For someone who does a little of everything and isn't concerned with performance, cross-trainers may be a good option. Look for cross-trainers that have a firm heel, are lightweight, and provide adequate support.

Wrong Type

Wearing the right shoe gets even more complicated than tossing the wrong. It’s not just about choosing the right type of shoe for your sport, but choosing the right type of shoe for your foot and gait as well. For running, you can’t just choose a shoe that’s labeled for running and think you’re good to go. Specific shoes are made to support your particular foot shape and running style.

And don’t make the mistake of buying shoes based on their appearance. Instead, go to a specialty shoe store and have a professional salesperson help you find the shoe that truly fits. We have had several members strike out and buy the wrong shoe at our Red Deer gym and really go backwards instead of forward.  A knowledgeable salesperson will take three measurements of your foot (its length, width, and arch) to determine your shoe size. The shoe guru should also evaluate the way your foot hits the ground when you walk or run. Some people’s feet supinate or under-pronate (roll outward), some over-pronate (roll inward), and some have neutral pronation when their feet hit the ground. Under-pronated and over-pronated feet require extra support to avoid injury. This knowledge can help you find the shoe that truly fits.

Old Shoes, wrong shoes, and the wrong type of right shoes are three common mistakes people make. Ensure a successful, pain-free workout by wearing supportive shoes made for your foot and your activity of choice. 

 

 

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If You're Alive, Exercise at your Red Deer Gym!

If You’re Alive, Exercise!

 

Think you’re too old to exercise at your local Red Deer gym? Not by a decade. (Or two.)

Maybe in days gone by you had the energy and motivation to exercise. You may have even been a hockey player or marathon runner or just a Red Deer gym rat. But for whatever reason, exercise fell by the wayside over the years and you slowly became more and more inactive. And your health has suffered from it.

 

The good news is that it’s never too late to start exercising for the first time or to get back into it. Those who’ve been inactive for years can still improve their health with regular exercise—even you!

 

Even if you’re enjoying your silver or golden years, you can get started exercising today at your Red Deer gym with these tips.

 

Why Now?

 

Health and fitness experts agree: taking up exercise in your 60s and 70s is essential to lowering health risks and improving one’s quality of life. As far as your physical health goes, exercise helps prevent stroke, heart disease, high blood pressure, cancers, and diabetes. One study showed that sedentary older women who started walking just one mile a day cut their risk of cancer in half and prolonged their lives by years. The health benefits of new exercise were almost as effective as if the women had been exercising for years.

 

Exercise also works to keep your mind healthy by reducing your risk of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and depression. At the same time, it reduces stress and puts you in a better mood.

 

As an added perk, regular physical activity enables you to maintain your independence for longer, improves your balance, and strengthens your muscles. Everyday activities such as bathing, cleaning, and dressing are easier for those who exercise regularly. So if you enjoy living at your own place on your own terms, you’ll need to stay fit to make it happen.

 

What’s Your Excuse?

 

As the years go by and you become less active, your body isn’t able to do the things it used to do so easily. Walking up stairs, cleaning the house, and simple tasks like tying your shoes become more difficult. These changes in physical abilities can lead to discouragement (maybe one of the reasons you haven't stepped foot in a Red Deer gym in a long time).

 

Because of this, many older folks are fearful of exercise, thinking they may get injured or that it’ll be too hard. The reality, however, is that sitting on the couch is what’s risky and damaging to your health.

 

How to Start?

 

Those who are 65 years or older and are thinking of getting back into exercise will need to head to a medical pro first. There, you can get advice on the best types of exercise for any pre-existing health conditions you may have. For example, if you suffer from arthritis or bad knees, swimming is a good alternative.

 

When getting started, you’ll want to take it easy. Overdoing it too soon can cause soreness, injury, or burnout. Aim for 150 minutes of exercise each week, but if you’ve been inactive for more than a few months, start with just a few minutes a day and work your way up to the recommended amount. Exercise at an intensity you can still carry on a conversation, and most importantly, listen to your body. It’ll let you know when it needs to slow down.

 

What To Do?

 

Getting back into the swing of exercise can be intimidating. A balanced exercise program will include cardio, strength training, flexibility, and balance exercises. Three days a week do cardio exercise (walking, swimming, gardening, or cycling). Every other day include strength-training activities at your Red Deer gym that include free weights, resistance bands, or body-weight exercises. Incorporate stretches and balance activities into your routine.

 

Don’t wait another day. Enjoy your latter years and get more of them with exercise!

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In this article, learn why flexibility is crucial while working out in your Red Deer gym.


 
Flexibility in Strength Training - Why EVERYONE Needs to be Concerned with Range of Motion
red-deer-gym
 

 

 

In the current fitness industry and in lots of Red Deer gyms, all too often principles will be emphasized for a specific target population and ignored for another. A good example of this type of selective fitness requirement is the appreciation for flexibility and its importance for the elderly and the injured. It is not too common to hear a muscle-bound young male in the gym discussing with his lifting buddies how much time and effort he puts into maintaining the ability to touch his toes. Although this individual may not appreciate flexibilities importance, if he gets injured it will be too late. Unfortunately not often recognized, flexibility while important for the above mentioned groups is just as important for the athletic populations as well for both joint health and optimal performance.
 
If we consider full body movements such as squatting and deadlifting, or more dynamic exercises such as would be included in sport; running, jumping, throwing, they all require fundamental ranges of motion. Therefore, to be able to deadlift, I need a certain amount of hamstring flexibility to allow for me to successfully hinge at my hip while not damaging my lower back. If I am a power lifter or Olympic weightlifter and cannot obtain a good base squat position without load, I am asking to waste energy to obtain my position and possibly get injured in my pursuit of strength. Training ranges of motion that have not been earned by the individual is a dangerous path to continue down. Not only are you fighting where your body feels comfortable to be, but also loading the pattern.
 
Muscles’ force potential and ability to create leverage to cause movement at the joints is dependent on an idea known as equivalent tension, sometimes termed joint centration. In ideal joint centration, all muscles on all sides of a joint have equal pull, allowing for smooth and efficient movement at the joint in question. This is important for athletes as if they have extremely tight hamstring muscles, the lack of range of motion in this muscle will negatively impact my ability to use the opposing muscle group, the quadriceps. In an athletic endeavor (yes, flexibility is important in athletics just as much as fitness in Red Deer gyms), this could be represented by my inability to produce substantial kicking power in soccer, football and the like. An appreciation of how muscles lack of flexibility can reduce the opposing muscles potential is essential in any individuals training program, and if not respected is often the culprit behind overuse injuries.
 
So the next time you are in your Red Deer gym, take a few minutes post workout to do some active stretching of the muscle groups that you have just worked. The period immediately following exercise offers a time in which the muscles are better prepped too allow for better and more effective stretching due to having good blood flow and recent use of ranges of motion. This attention to reducing tension will be instrumental in reducing muscle soreness in the following days to come. Training builds tension, to assure we offset this, stretching needs to be performed routinely just as the training that leads to it.
 
Ryan Darling, M.Sc.
Personal Trainer, 360 Fitness
Red Deer, AB.
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